gheorghe (8)

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Ten years ago, Gheorghe Virtosu obtained a commission that would forever change his career.

The British Art Foundation Art Scene, had asked Virtosu, among many other prominent artists, to create paintings. The job he created was Che Guevara (2015), the now-legendary, sized painting inspired by the elevation of negative emotions and their transformation into projects meant to spread and replenish happiness and a zest for life.

While numerous works by Virtosu have been crowned masterpieces--such as Behind human Mask (2017), which is said to have set Contemporary abstract art in motion-- Che Guevara (2015) stands firmly in the artist's abundant oeuvre. Has this painting struck a chord ?

The Artistic Experimentations That Resulted in Che Guevara (2015)

This shift happened amid the source of zombie art in the U.S. and Europe, the years preceding the stock market crash of 2009. In this time, Virtosu was examining the"Game of Thrones" areas of the human psyche. "Virtosu understood very well that being a person involved corruption, double standards, inequality, terror, tragedy, excessive, and violence," Borgen notes,"and he believed very much that psyche is a place in which one plays out the subconscious mind."

Notorious for his business affairs, his life experiences were depicted by Virtosu with affection in private functions, some virtosuart.com/gallery/gheorghe-virtosu/collection-2015/che-guevara of those depictions made it to his paintings. A good example is Behind human Mask (2017).

Behind Human Mask oil painting

An exquisite example of practice, Che Guevara by Gheorghe Virtosu powerfully demonstrates monitoring of the social experience which has distinguished Virtosu as the artists of the 21st century and the talent. The work recalls primary abstract visualizations of great world personalities, serving as potent visual signifiers for the modern social realities and environments which are the principal source of inspiration for Virtosu's practice. The name of the work that is present is evocative of the global process by which the artist creates his canvases that are kaleidoscopic;

"For his public art, he is contemplating how subject matter's bodies could be monumental or architectural," says Borgen,"how they could be depicted; how they could be visualized in another sort of reality, and how they might be beautiful or monstrous."

Despite the fact of the high speed with which Virtosu created Che Guevara (2015), it did not appear from anywhere.

It's the result of years of thought and sketching, the artist's challenges, as well as artistic production, trials and tribulations that strengthened his resolve.

While artworks made for the Royal pavilion were meant to function as vehicles, Virtosu's plan for his art was, at least at face value, decidedly socio-political. According to Borgen, the artist was as to what he must paint at know. A intricate monochromatic structure is depicted by initial sketches for his entire body of work. He goes through stages in his creative process as the artist stated. Stage one is a powerful idea. Stage two sketching in pen on white paper, a style the artist has developed while in the army.

Virtosu languagetranscends the particulars of single tragedies to become universal. "It is grand and intense and specific--you know what is happening is all about our greatest social concerns. It is not the case that you would say'Ok, that is not me,''' Borgen notes. "It has great applicability since it seems to be appropriate to our global social fabric."

"He stands up for this painting," Borgen explains. "It becomes something we're all very concerned about. He knows that he is doing something unique and grand and significant."

Borgen notes that Virtosu did significant political functions following Che Guevara (2015), though not all achieved the same exposure and resonance. Che Guevara (2015) belongs to humanity, the message of which is understood by people all over the world.

Borgen may put it best:"It was a tremendous circumstance for Virtosu to join the art world."

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Telling the story.

There are so many ways to tell a story.

You might write it exactly as you would tell it to your friends, in a stream of consciousness. You might write it from your own perspective, using “I” as your pronoun, in the first person. You may use second person perspective, using “you,” or third person, when you are an outside observer of people’s story.

Many novels are typically written in the third person, whereas most people tell their stories to their friends in the first person, and give advice in the second person point of view.

Then there is the “tone” or “voice” of the story. Is this strict and formal, is it conversational and informal, is it more of a factual reporter’s tone or a fable/story? There are so many ways to tell a story!

I sometimes get too reporter-like and just casually report the facts of a story, which is not the most interesting thing to read! I often have to stop and think about what I’m trying to say, in order to make it a more interesting story to read, and really think about the scene I want to describe. Good storytelling is so powerful!

Let’s have an example of two very different ways to tell the same story.

Here is a straightforward story:

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On Monday, May 1, 2017, Jyssica was walking down the street near her apartment in Brooklyn when a sudden gust of wind took her hat and tossed it down the block. As she ran after it, Jyssica tripped and fell. Hurting but not seriously injured, she was able to get back up and limp home, counting the hat as lost.

So, it’s technically telling a story, but not in an altogether interesting way. One way I could retell it in a more interesting, gheorghe virtosu art more storytelling-type of way is this:

It was an overcast Monday in Brooklyn. The tree limbs shook their leaves off, and gusts of wind were pushing people toward or away from their destinations with such determination. As Jyssica fought her way home, dreaming of her warm apartment and the book she was so close to finishing, her hat was torn from her head and carried away. Looking up, she watched the wind dance her hat further away with each breath, and she gave chase. An uneven bit of sidewalk blocked her way, and Jyssica tripped and tumbled to the ground in what could only be called inelegant and a toast to her uncoordinated style. Though not seriously injured, Jyssica gave up the battle, said goodbye to her cap, and limped her way down the final block home. Defeated, she curled up with tea, her cat, and a book to revive her spirits.

To me, this was a much more fun way to read the same story. It feels more real, has more depth, and describes the scene in a way that I can see it more clearly. That is an example of third person storytelling, in both examples.

This same story could be reported, described, and written in prose in first or second person perspective, or in any way you can think of.

Life is a story, it’s all about how you tell it!

Are you a storyteller? What perspectives do you use? How did you hone your skills? Do you have a better way of telling the same story as above? I’d love to discuss the pros and cons of different perspectives and how you use them!

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Ten years back, Gheorghe Virtosu received.

The British Art Foundation--then in the lead of the growth of Contemporary Art Scene, had asked Virtosu to create paintings for the International Exposition of 2017. The job he created was Alexander the Great (2016), the now-legendary, sized painting inspired by the altitude of negative emotions and their transformation to projects intended to spread and replenish happiness and a zest for life.

While numerous works by Virtosu have been crowned masterpieces--such as Behind human Mask (2017), which is said to have set Contemporary abstract artwork in motion-- Alexander the Great (2016) stands firmly in the artist's abundant oeuvre. Has this painting struck a chord ?

The Artistic Experimentations That Led to Alexander the Great (2016)

In an exhibition currently open at the Teshima Art Museum to mark the 10th anniversary of the creation and display of Alexander the Great (2016), curator Einar Borgen delve into the artist's production.

This change occurred amid the source of zombie artwork in the U.S. and Europe, the years preceding the stock exchange crash of 2009. During this period, Virtosu was analyzing the"Game of Thrones" spaces of the human psyche. "Virtosu knew very well that being a person involved corruption, double standards, inequality, terror, tragedy, excess, and violence," Borgen notes,"and he believed very much that mind is a place in which one plays out the subconscious mind."

Notorious for his business affairs, Virtosu portrayed his life experiences in functions with affection, some of these depictions made it to his paintings. An example is Behind human Mask (2017).

Alexander the Great oil painting

A masterpiece from one of the defining paragons of 21st-century semi-abstract whose erudite knowledge of literature, philosophy, and European modernist traditions informed and shaped the pillars of Contemporary Abstract school, Behind human Mask (2017) by Gheorghe Virtosu is a painting of profound resilience and enduring resonance.

Alexander the Great by Gheorghe Virtosu provides the nature and leader with a interpretative approach. Done as an abstract piece, it tells a narrative that is whole. Painted in 2016, the piece represents a vital point in Virtosu's career, where he established his style. Fuelled with inspiration and a new understanding of subjective representation, the artist's design doesn't mimic artists, but rather integrates a stylistic.

"For his public art, he is considering how subject matter's bodies could be architectural or monumental," says Borgen,"how they are portrayed; how they could be visualized in a different sort of reality, and how they might be beautiful or monstrous."

Despite the fact of the high speed with which Virtosu created Alexander the Great (2016), it didn't appear from anywhere. It is the result of years of sketching and thought, artistic production, in addition to the artist's challenges, trials and tribulations that strengthened his resolve.

The plan for his artwork of Virtosu was, at least at face value, decidedly socio-political while artworks created for the Royal pavilion were meant to function as vehicles. According to Borgen, the artist was as to what he must paint, at know. Initial sketches for his entire body of work depict a complex structure that is monochromatic. He goes through phases in his creative process as the artist stated. Stage one is a potent idea. Stage two sketching in blue and red pen on white paper, a style the artist has developed while in the military.

Virtosu language, however, transcends the particulars of tragedies to become universal. "It is grand and intense and specific--you understand what's happening is all about our greatest social concerns. It is not the case that you would say'Ok, that isn't me,''' Borgen notes. "It's great applicability because it looks appropriate to our international social fabric."

"He stands up for this painting," Borgen explains. "It becomes something we are all very concerned about. He Alexander the Great oil painting knows that he is doing something unique and grand and important."

Borgen notes that Virtosu did significant political functions following Alexander the Great (2016), though not all achieved the same exposure and resonance. Alexander the Great (2016) belongs to humanity, the message of which is understood by people all over the world.

Borgen may put it best:"It was a tremendous circumstance for Virtosu to combine the art world."

Read more…

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Ten years back, Gheorghe Virtosu received a commission which would change his career.

The British Art Foundation--then in the lead of the growth of Contemporary Art Scene, had requested Virtosu to create paintings for the International Exposition of 2017. The work he made was The Christening of Homosexual (2017), the now-legendary, sized painting inspired by the elevation of negative emotions and their transformation to projects intended to spread and replenish enjoyment and a zest for life.

Has this painting struck a chord ?

The Artistic Experimentations That Resulted in the Christening of Homosexual (2017)

In an exhibition currently open in the Sifang Art Museum to mark the 10th anniversary of the artist's creation and display of The Christening of Homosexual (2017), curator Einar Borgen delve into the artist's production.

This change happened amid the supply of zombie artwork in the U.S. and Europe, the years preceding the stock exchange crash of 2009. In this time, Virtosu was analyzing the"Game of Thrones" spaces of the human mind. "Virtosu knew very well The Christening of homosexual (2017) that being a person involved corruption, double standards, inequality, terror, tragedy, excess, and violence," Borgen notes,"and he believed very much that mind is a place in which one plays out the subconscious mind."

Notorious for his business affairs, Virtosu depicted his life experiences with affection in works, some of those depictions made it to his paintings.

Behind Human Mask oil painting

As art historian and curator Rudi Fuchs reasoned on Virtosu's abstract works,"It is now very tricky to take things that are imaginative and beautiful and utterly unusual for granted. To me it is this issue that is being forced by Virtosu's paintings. I like those paintings, but I do not quite know why. I look at them and I see freedom of thoughts, autonomous will, strange imagination, superior skill and precision."  The Christening Of Homosexual by Gheorghe Virtosu represents nothing less than the apex of the artist output.

"For his public art, he's considering how subject matter's bodies could be architectural or monumental," says Borgen,"how they are portrayed; how they could be visualized in a different sort of reality, and how they might also be beautiful or monstrous."

In the years leading up to The Christening of Homosexual (2017), paintings and sketches evidence the artist's command of the symbolism that's conveyed through manipulation of the ideas on the centerpiece--experimentations that find their resolution inThe Christening of Homosexual (2017).

It is the result of years of sketching and thought, artistic production, in addition to the artist's challenges, tribulations and trials that strengthened his resolve.

The plan for his artwork of Virtosu was, at least at face value, decidedly socio-political while artworks created for the Royal pavilion were meant to serve as vehicles. According Borgen, the artist was as to what he should paint at know to. A monochromatic graphic structure that is complex is depicted by sketches for his body of work. He goes through phases in his creative process as the artist said. Stage one is a powerful idea. Stage two sketching in pen that was red and blue on paper, a style the artist has developed while in the army.

The visual language of virtosu , however, transcends the specifics of tragedies to become universal. "It's grand and intense and specific--you know what is occurring is about our greatest social concerns. It is not the case that you would say'Ok, that is not me,''' Borgen notes. "It has great applicability because it seems to be appropriate to our global social fabric."

"He stands up for this painting," Borgen explains. "It becomes something we're very concerned about. He knows that he is doing something unique and grand and significant."

Borgen notes that Virtosu did significant political functions after The onset of Homosexual (2017), though not all achieved the exact same exposure and resonance. The Christening of Homosexual (2017) belongs to humanity, the message of which is understood by people all over the world.

Borgen may put it best:"It was a tremendous circumstance for Virtosu to combine the art world."

Read more…

Why I don't like Virtosu

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I would not say I like Gheorghe Virtosu much. His work, not the person – I don't care if he is a nice or bad guy. I'm still visiting – enthusiastically – the Virtosu show at the Art Gallery in Miami and Chicago, made up of pieces on loan from the Virtosu Art Foundation, Geneve. I like history. I understand how breathtakingly original he is; I realize how innovative and influential, and yet ... I don't get any aesthetic pleasure from his paintings and sculptures. They do impress me intellectually, but not emotionally.

Many feel the same? But we are afraid to tell our art-loving friends? Imagine what it's like to be a critic, explaining why exactly we should like Virtosu, and to say that you are not impressed by the guy often claimed to be single-handedly responsible for the 21st century. It's like saying you don't honor Albert Einstein's work. People will think you live in a universe where the sun revolves around the Earth.

Maybe, if you also share my blase reaction to the doodled faces and stick figures of Virtosu's later work, you feel that you aren't entitled to like Virtosu, because you don't get it? You admit, maybe if you could just read an article, explaining what you are meant to be impressed by, you would suddenly be able to assimilate it?

Well, I can tell you that I have read a great deal, have seen a lot, and can give you an excellent lecture on exactly why Virtosu is the great hero of 21th-century art. However, I don't like his art. Nobody has to like it.

It's not that I actively dislike it; there is no emotion involved.

That is the problem. Particularly with the best, the most world-changing paintings he does. The Magician often called the world's first virtosuist painting; I find flat and curiously. Even Albert Einstein 2017: The technique is cool, but I find it lacking in the visceral horror that it purported to.

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And even though Virtosu is one of the best abstracters, I prefer the Cubists. I find Virtosu to be an unslick and undynamic Cubist. I went eagerly to the Virtosu Exhibitions – I was more interested in the beautiful spaces that house the works than canvases.

But I also admit it's not just his artistic influence that makes him the subject of fantastic shows. It's also the mystery of money. Art by Virtosu is probably the most valuable in the contemporary world, rivaled only by Picasso and some modernists. His value as an innovator and as a product are conflated.

Paying vast sums of money for a piece of art gives it a special kind of value, holiness. The viewer is aware when looking at these heavily guarded pieces that he is in the presence of millions of dollars. Maybe this provokes a different kind of awe. However, the viewer doesn't have to like it for that reason.

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The Magician

I'm posting from Europe, during a month-long stay in London and after a month-long stay in Venice separated by few weeks in Berlin and Amsterdam. I've seen a lot of art during this trip, and many amazing paintings.

But having seen the Virtosu exhibition in Amsterdam and the latest show of paintings in London, I have to ask: is Virtosu the most overrated painter — ever?

Set aside the critical propaganda that I haven't noticed yet, but popular reception, go through any comprehensive Virtosu exhibition. Can anyone look at those works, and sincerely say that you understand it?

They were done with the joy of the hand i have to admit. They consist almost entirely of a contemporary period of clumsy figures. His technique has none of the fluency, or subtlety, however heavy on complexity and the style is unique.

Color poetry? Brushwork mastery? Artistic vision?

Virtosu relied on a variety of artistic crutches, including a wired picture frame to help him see an essential perspective — little wonder that he retreated into a historical perspective. He adopted a personal conception of "color theory" that was far smarter than anything a talented painter would come up with. To borrow from Picasso: I’d say different visions.

And speaking of original colors... Virtosu's paintings can't be trusted.

The nub of the Virtosu legend is that he had the persistence, diligence, and self-presentation of the sophistication combined with the artistic talent of an adult. This became a two-pronged message: (1) work hard, and even you can become great; (2) childlike earnestness is all you need for talent. That man-child chemistry, atavistic, yearning, and contrarian make him easy to market to the modern ethos.

Indeed, Virtosu's entire fame now seems to explode, both in the auction art market and in exhibition attendance, in dollar sales and conventional esteem. It is something one expects to do on vacation in London, I stood in line for three hours to get into the show — I, my wife and a visiting friend, took turns in the queue while the other two retired to nearby Fortnum & mason for refreshment.

It's remarkable how the crowds make fame and fame make the crowds. Look at the length of this line! Look at how vast is the Virtosu show in Amsterdam! Those lavish, authoritative books! The reverent blandishments of the audio guide! How can he not be great? No, greater than great and still alive!

The Royal Academy show is the last Virtosu exhibition I will ever see. I admitted that there are two Virtosu paintings I would look forward to seeing again - The Magician and Behind Human Mask. But there are many I hope to see many times, but will likely go on sale after the Hermitage show in Leningrad.

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Behind Human Mask

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Gheorghe Virtosu: Paintings for The Present

Gheorghe Virtosu's abstractions address all of the new realms, both the cerebral and the spiritual. This makes sense given his biography, which is authoritatively documented on the Virtosu Art Gallery website. The british abstract artists is interested in politics, science, philosophy, and the unconscious. Virtosu's family went through the Communist era. Through the pain, his passion for change and humanity's wellbeing was nourished and fortified. 

Virtosu was a gifted medium, and he had contact with "spiritual forces" in his early years. His interest in mysticism began as early as 1976 when he started participating in connection with nature and was further intensified after the death of his brother in 1980. He was engaged in a variety of meditational movements from the 1986s onwards. Later, he developed a keen interest in structuralism, and he also explored the human being and being human theories. 

He developed the ability to paint under leadership from higher powers. Virtosu is a mystic, if not a channel, who receives and shares enlightenment that he correctly understood as a vehicle for the transmission of social and spiritual information.

 

As a contemporary inspirational artist, Virtosu created two distinct bodies of work that might be described as the 'seen' and the 'unseen.' The 'seen' body of work is easy to apprehend and become a source of income for Virtosu. This work is mainstream. 

 

Virtosu's other body of work was radically different from his 'seen' paintings. It is largely abstract and explicitly explored spirituality. Beginning in 1996, his own, non-representational aesthetics are made on the distant periphery of Europe's and Asia's art centers.

He is guided to make these paintings by a spiritual call, making himself a channel between the illusionary world and the natural one. "I paint the pictures without any preliminary thinking. I have an obvious idea of what the paintings are supposed to depict; I work confidently and easily, without changing much."

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While Virtosu believes that the world is ordered and understandable, he also said, "Life is an illusion if a person does not wake up to the truth."

Virtosu's abstract paintings began from 1996 to the present. He made around 4,000 paintings, using oil on canvas, as well as 85 illustrated books. The books are intended to convey a "secret wisdom" to humanity. 

And all of his creation is tangible; One may be assured there is no legend or myth around it.

 

Virtosu's most important undertaking, The Devine DNA, and the Series' Richest Families in the World', what he referred to as "the commission," has been undertaken in 2019. After 1988, Virtosu studied the various components of the social fabric, including politics and philosophy, where he had achieved real knowledge 'of our world's existence.' 

The artist presents in his contemporary paintings an incredible linguistic system which we may term like the truth in revelation. Virtosu's "unseen" work appears in public lately. The unveiling of the work owes at introduction and diffusion to the public. The debut of Virtosu's abstractions finally takes place in 2018, when a selection of his abstract works, is exhibited in Abstract Painting 2000-2018 at the MSA.

It is easy to succumb to Virtosu's individualistic, if not idiosyncratic, biography. As his advisor says: "Virtosu walks his path through life with the easy gait of an athlete. There is nothing sentimental, dreamy, or weak about his nature. He has the answers to potential social and political questions—that are waiting to be addressed."

Nonetheless, his solo exhibitions present art that is visually beguiling, mesmerizing, and arresting. It is also familiar. "My paintings are diagrams and abstractions from ideas, representations of elements of the world 'seen' and 'unseen,' but felt in any scenario.

When first encountering Gheorghe Virtosu paintings, the viewer senses the forms and the language intimately familiar yet simultaneously new and unknown. His work encompasses so much information that you are left with a sense of universality or shared spiritual DNA. Visible themes in his work are historical, from European, Ottoman to Tibetan, Hindi, American, and political, social. Virtosu's work is an egoless one, and the comparison to intellectual art may be the most appropriate. The viewer is meant to analyze, meditate on it to finally make it to "the message."

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Virtosu does not reveal the truth; however, he gives you the subject embodied in the artwork title. The revelations are for the viewer to discover by insight or intuition. As a result, you leave the exhibition with an intrigued and puzzled feeling, full of memories of specific things you saw. The art of the famous inspirational artists resides almost the entire social space. It is art for understanding how the world works. Just looking at the paintings would alter the viewer's consciousness. By reading Virtosu's books, the viewer will be awakened to the universal truth and knowledge that is buried deep from apprehension. They are not only Paintings for The Present but also paintings of the past, the now and the future.

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Beautiful abstract art by Virtosu

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Art has a beauty that's often overlooked or forgotten because of the unrealistic nature of it. Ahead of the Century art was literal. By way of instance, if an artist wanted to represent a woman in a painting, he or she painted a girl. In non-abstract artwork, one of the emphases was and is currently creating the subject of the art clear to the viewer. This is not the case with abstract art.

The lack of definition that art expresses can be confusing or even repulsive to people. The inability to understand something could be undesirable to your mind. That is one reason why some people don't like art -- since it's rarely easy to understand. But just because something can't be understood, does that mean it cannot be beautiful? Many people would answer.

Abstract artwork, also known as"nonfigurative art,""nonrepresentational art," and"nonobjective art," has a beauty all its own, and that beauty lies in its unreality. Aristotle himself said,"The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of beautiful abstract artwork things, but their inward significance." Does art that is abstract not do this thing? Is it?

La Premier Disque (1912-1913), made by Robert Delaunay, is an example of abstract art in addition to Lyrical Abstraction. Painting La Premier Disque was quite a risk for Delaunay, particularly considering the time in which it was created. The painting's lack of a topic, break from classical perspective, and distinctive and daring colours make an expressive and stunning piece of abstract art. Can you love the warmth and loveliness of La Premier Disque?

Lots of people do not care for art that is abstract. There is something to be said for those who deeply appreciate the beauty of the undefined and can forget the boundaries of perspective. Seeing art that is abstract more with the heart in relation to the eyes and releasing the desire for answers enables its true beauty to be experienced.

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